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Release The Full Mueller Report, Mass. Members Of Congress Say

March 24, 2019
In The News

For Massachusetts' congressional delegation, a four-page letter summarizing Special Counsel Robert Mueller's 22-month investigation into President Trump's role in Russian interference in the 2016 election is not nearly enough.

The all-Democratic delegation is calling on U.S. Attorney General William Barr to release the full report.

"Congress didn't ask for a 'summary,' Attorney General Barr," Sen. Elizabeth Warren, who's also a presidential candidate, tweeted on Sunday. "Members of the House voted 420-0 to release the report. The American people deserve to see the full report."

Sen. Ed Markey also took to Twitter to compare the summary to a book report based on a Cliff Notes summary, and called on members of Congress to wait to make final determinations until they'd seen the full report.

In a statement, U.S. Rep. Jim McGovern emphasized that the report has not exonerated the president, which Barr notes in the letter.

"It shouldn't surprise anyone that the president's own, hand-picked Attorney General doesn't think he obstructed justice," McGovern said in the statement. "He's entitled to his opinion, but Congress must see the full, unedited report to decide whether or not the president abused his power."

Said Rep. Ayanna Pressley, in a statement: "The American people deserve the truth. A summary is insufficient. What we have seen today does not exonerate the occupant of the White House from obstruction of justice nor abuse of power."

Rep. Seth Moulton, who is also exploring a run for president, said in a statement that "every American deserves to see the full report, not the Executive Branch’s whitewashed version of it."

Trump has celebrated Barr's letter, saying he's been vindicated. But on Twitter, Moulton added that "celebrating not being indicted is a pretty low bar for moral leadership."

Rep. Richard Neal, chairman of the powerful Ways and Means Committee, and Rep. Joe Kennedy III and also weighed in on Twitter, calling for the report to be made public.